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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 227 (some duplicates have been removed)
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
-- she pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton'
mouse gimmick to win elections without having to win with the most number of votes. rebel all of those cuts and the effort to make it harder for people to vote, all of that targeting to vote in ways that people don't like voting? well, now they're trying something new. they don't like states like pennsylvania that regularly vote democratic. so some kwauk thougquack thaugo to give the rural votes more power. their decided to kill the power of how the real state goes overall. if they can't get people to vote for them, they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, president obama won. this president has no time to waste and he's using it to push for change on gun control, on immigration, on climate change, on ending the ban on women serving in combat. he's got a full agenda. and it was on full display today. remember all of that bluster from
recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real refos. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthox and traworthodox an thoho are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beliefs, and which people enjoy common r
elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands
on the dupont. >> thank you so much. >> rose: we turn now to politics and elections in israel and jordan earlier this week. this comes at a time when the winds of change are sweeping through the middle east. since the start of the arab spring political unrest in jordan has intensified. many groups including the muslim brotherhood boy kod the election with more than half of jordan's registered voters participated. this is part of a series of reforms king abdullah ii has implemented to combat political discents. if israel benjamin netanyahu was granted aid third term as a prime minister in the coalition government but the real winner maybe lapid worst centrist party gain gained substantial ground, joining me is jordan ambassador to the united nation and efraim halevy who served in the israel national security council. i'm pleased to have them both on this program to talk together at this table about important things that are going on in their region including elections, mr. ambassador, thank you for coming. tell me what we read into the jordanian elections and what they tell us about the f
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
's nominations today a perfect example of how elections have consequences? >> well, sitting where i'm sitting, not in the clint eastwood chair, i would say yes, it certainly does. it's a case of continuing a very tough policy of enforcement at the sec. so the president is sending a signal that at least in this area of regulation enforcement, he's not going to be backing down at all. surely, that's exactly what wall street and corporate america expected when he won that election. >> and that was the way he campaigned. in many ways, we're looking at, joan, him continuing the path that he campaign ds oed on, gots on and won. look at the poll on rights for gay people, 60%. on aid to the poor, 59%, on tax levels for millionaires and big corporation, 59%. women's issue, 55%. immigration, 55%. i mean, these are high numbers of people feeling the gop is out of touch on these issues. >> yeah, i mean, reverend al, the shocking thing is, as you just laid out, the support for democratic policies is even h h higher than support for democratic politicians. the president won a decisive victory, but the sup
on president obama's foreign policy challenges in his second term. what's the meaning of the election in israel this week as that gets sorted out and netanyahu tries to build a new government? there's the threat of iran, what do we make of it? >> well, we have to see what government actually is formed, it's a coalition government in israel. i think it's likely now to be a center-right government rather than the right wing rump government that looked likely given the pulse before the election. that is essentially better news. it means that israel is going, i think, to be more willing to engage in making peace with the palestinians. that the two-stage solution which is on life support at the moment has a chance to breathe again. i wouldn't take it further than that, but there's a limited sliver of hope put it that way in that regard. when it comes to iran, i don't think the election changes things that much. essentially this is an american-led problem. and as much as netanyahu threatens force, i think he will take the lead from president obama who has made it clear he's not going to allow iran to
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
to put it aside and not talk about it in the election and here we are, back with his promise and what was more interesting, too, not only did he make that promise, but you had somebody like barbara boxer, whose the senator from california, big climate person, she gave some details, too, how they intend to pursue this, normally through the epa for a carbon regulation program and thinking of putting in place a carbon tax. >> paul: oh, well, we'll talk a little about that. steve, so is this really a regulatory agenda? i don't think that cap and trade, the old program can pass even a democratic senate. it couldn't the first time when they controlled everything. >> yeah, there's a reason that president obama almost never mentioned the words climate change and cap and trade during the the campaign, paul, because they're political losers, they're big tax increases on workers, on union workers, on manufacturing workers, and so, the democrats have avoided that issue now that they've won this election, they've sort of sprung it on people and i don't believe the votes are there in the united sta
east. but because of elections, elections, today governments across the middle east in egypt, tunisia, libya, pal stipe, turkey, iraq -- palestine, turkey, iraq, they are all pursuing at least, at least independent foreign policies which are by definition much less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states and much more open to the islamic republic of iran. simply put, today the united states is in a profoundly weaker position in the middle east, and the islamic republic of rapp is in a significantly -- of iran is in a significantly stronger position. that has essentially happened because there has been a dramatic shift in the middle east balance of power. in our book, "going to tehran," we describe how part of why this shift has and is occurring is because of mistakes in american policies in the middle east. but we also describe in our book that part of what is going on is something vastly upside appreciated in -- underappreciated in the west which are the successes of the islamic republic of iran which are also driving the shift in the regional balance of power
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
are incorrigible. i was literally inaugurated four days ago, and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> and i am -- as you know, steve, i am still secretary of state, so i'm out of politics, and i'm forbidden from even hearing these questions. >> violence rages across egypt for a fifth straight day. we will have a live report. >>> and brazil mourns more than 230 young victims of a horrendous nightclub fire as police make the first arrests. >> coulded gay. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington where he begin with breaking news today. word exclusively of what could be a major policy shift on access for gay youths to the boy scouts. nbc justice correspondent pete williams joins me now from the newsroom with the latest on this exclusive story where are pete. >> the boy scouts are considering dropping their national ban on gay scouts or gay scout leaders, and that would be a profound change for an iconic american organization, one that has resisted this for several decades. the policy is now under consideration by the board's national -- the organization's national board of directors. i
has his eye towards the general election, that he does not see his advantage in being as obstructionist as he was the last two years. he has an obvious advantage in kentucky. it is a red state. it is possible that there could be a democrat that could come up, if there is too much frustration. he is the senate, as much as harry reid is, because he is a party leader. congress's approval rating is in the single digits. that is not exactly something you want when you're going before voters. the more he can look reasonable, the better he looks. host: ryan grim, explaining some of the changes to the filibuster rule. he is the washington bureau chief for the -- for "the huffington post." back to your calls -- we're focusing on the pentagon lifting the ban on combat roles for women. on twitter -- from our facebook page -- tracey says -- sac joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. -- zach joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. caller: when we look at the labor market, allowing men and women to serve together, it will have hug
have real challenges. and we did get whipped in the presidential election. and that's not something that we take lightly. >> but so far, there is no consensus about how to fix them. republican national committee chairman, reince priebus, is expected to be re-elected today, after quietly making nice with ron paul supporters and heading off any challenge to his leadership. he'll call for a, quote, republican renewal, in a speech this afternoon. but the rnc committee drafting the plan for change is made up of party insiders, rather than anyone who's likely to break china. meanwhile, republican governors are griping privately and publicly that the gop in washington is doing nothing to help the republican brand, after being schooled by new jersey governor chris christie. washington republicans got a talking-to last night from louisiana governor, bobby jindal, who said the gop has to stop being a stupid party and talk like adults. >> today's conservatism is completely wrapped up in solving the hideous mess that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government boo
the racial progress our society has made, on the civil rights movement to the re- election of president obama, the pervasive association with black people and the ghetto betrays a persistent cultural lag. it has been two generation since .chools were desegregated if till were alive today, would remember stories of lynchings peppering the "new york times." he would remember the william man -- million -man march. a black man became president of the united states. he would have been 73 had he lived. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we have been joined by taylor branch. i will just let you know that we have been speaking. douglas blackmon spoke. elijah anderson spoke. i would invite you to the podium and talk about the attempted second emancipation proclamation. ladies and gentlemen, taylor branch. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, paul. i don't want to pay tribute to the marc commuter line. i was only on for two extra hours. i am glad to be here. i want to pay tribute to the " washington month
has netanyahu lost steam? >> this is a very interesting revolution. there's no doubt but this election, in fact with the defeat for netanyahu. >> meaning what? he won the election. >> he may be the next prime minister. his party went down. >> who, yahir? >> no, netanyahu's own party went down from 42 seats to 31 seats. so his party had fewer seats. this guy came out of nowhere. his first time running for office. he got 19 seats. he became the most -- the second most important party in -- out of nowhere. so he has become the star of this thing. and netanyahu is going to have to make a deal with him. all of the politicians are splintered but it's never been like this. now netanyahu is going to have to move, if i may say so, this is now a center right. it is going to be much more pragmatic and open. >> how long is his term? >> five years, isn't it? >> it can be as much as five years but it almost never lasts five years because the coalition breaks up. >> how long do you think he will be prime minister? >> i think the next three years at least. >> what happened to ohlmert? >> in my judgmen
believes since the re-election, the president has gotten more come bative. in the latest fox poll released shortly before the inauguration, 55% of voters said he has been more confrontationm toward congressional republicans. only 30% said he has been more bipartisan. >> i regret that i didn't hear one word from the president about it's time we all sat down and worked together. an addressed these issues that are confronting the nation. it is what it is. >> white house officials note the president tried for weeks to work out a budget deal with boehner. >> even though - wildly recognized to have been made in good faith and to have represented an effort to meet the republicans halfway, the republicans walked away. >> now boehner's aides note the president warned the speaker if he didn't agree to tax increases and a long-term hi ceiling, the president would campaign against him for the next two years, charging he caused another recession. which is why boehner's aides say anailiation is the right word. >> bret: ed henry live on the north lawn. thank you. what do republicans plan to do about it?
there. >> one interpretation of the election is that fracking cost mitt romney the presenthe presi. it really did make a significant difference in what turned out to be swing states. >> it did. >> and not think oklahoma was in place. -- i do not think oklahoma was in place. [laughter] >> our company has doubled the size of our employment base there. we are not huge employers yet. 750 people. that is double what we were three years ago. >> one of the environmental challenges, people worry about what you put down the wells in fracking, but it is mostly water and sand. the problem is what comes up. there is naturally occurring radioactive material down there. there is our sncc, barry m.. -- arsenic, barium. in the early days they would turn the water over to the municipal water authorities, who would water it down until they got down to the legal toxicity levels, and then dump it. the problem was, what do we do with all this waste water. they have decided, let's not a bit. they figured out ways to fill the water -- dum pit. they figured out ways to filter the water. >> that was someth
with everything even though they have a bad rating, it doesn't affect their chance of being re-elected. unfortunately, they have been stacking in state legislatures and in the house of representatives, all of these anti-choice laws that are every egregious wiggle they can come in. none of them, by the way would stand up against roe v. wade because there are so many price of concerns in the fetal heart beat bill. they're adding things like she has to be taped listening to it. the fact she's in the office being scrutinized or filmed while she's getting a medical procedure or -- >> it is a violation of privacy. >> hal: it is absurd. >> they do things even so much as -- i don't know if it's law necessarily or if it's just the doctor's preference to find out how far along the woman is but they'll have you get a sonogram and that can be traumatic. >> yeah. >> just making that decision, having to see what is growing at that moment can be traumatic for a woman. unless you're in that position, it is inappropriate for someone to make that change on your behalf. >> hal: i believe that to be the g
had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until he does because without his leadership, no matter what the congress cobbles together in the regard, it's not going go forward. and so, that to me is the challenge of the day. it has a significant play on our national security, our ability to fund the military so it can engage where we need it to engage. we can't solve everything through drones. and that has major implications on the diplomacy, foreign aid, and in particular because it's way down the priority list of the american spending. and so that is the overarching issue, and i have to say, absent in intervening, like we had in 9/11, it's all of a sudden that priority became number one and everybody rallied around the impee -- impetus for changing our policy. we want to do everything we can do to keep that intervening event from happening. that causes us to reorient our thin
to not comment between the election and inauguration because i wanted to see what kind of president we are looking at here. what kind of path he was putting his administration on, and all of the statements and comments lead me to my he is thinking more of a political conquest than political compromise. >> we will have more on that in just a moment. >>> also, a big week ahead in washington. hillary clinton set to step down as secretary of state this week and the gnat will hold a hearing on kerry to replace her. meantime in a new interview with the new republic president obama says gun control advocates need to listen to their opponents and understand and respect the tradition of hunting. he added that he enjoys skeet shooting at camp david. president weighed in on the dangers of football. they have been making headlines lately. he said if he had son he is not sure he would let his son play football. head over to the white house right now. peter alexander, some interesting stuff in that interview the president gave the new pacific republic, not just football and skeet shooting. >> that's
to put te'o side and not talk about it in the election. here we are back with his promise. and what was more interesting, too, is not only did he make that promise, but you had someone like barbara boxer who is the senator from california, a big climate person, she gave some details, too, about how they intend to pursue. this namely, they are going to go through the e.p.a. to do a big carbon regulation program. they are also thinking of putting in place a carbon tax. >> well, we will talk a little bit about that. steve, so is this a regulatory agenda because i don't think cap and trade, the old program can pass even a democratic senate. it couldn't the first time when they controlled everything. >> yeah, there isra a reason that president obama almost never mentions the words climate change and cap and trade during the campaign, paul, that's because they are political losers. they are big tax increases on workers, on union workers, on manufacturing workers. so the democrats have avoided that issue now that they have won this election. they have sort of sprung it out on people. i sti
and in his frustration the administration said, we were elected to govern and whether a national labor relations board or whatever, they wanted to put people in place to govern. i hope what happened thursday night, chris will change this. we had a bipartisan, strong bipartisan vote for some rules changes and included in those rules changes were changes in the way we treat nominees, not only for the courts but for these agencies. let's have a day in court for each one of them, and let's have a hearing and let's have a vote. >> chris: i want to move on to another subject but briefly, i understand the president's frustration, that doesn't mean he can just rewrite the constitution. >> listen, i worked in the congressional branch, legislative branch of our government and i certainly didn't hold up our team, model, whatever it happens to be, whoever the president happens to be, but i want to put it into perspective. we have seen this president denied the opportunity to make appointments. over and over and over again. because one senator happens to hate a particular agency or a particular per
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 227 (some duplicates have been removed)